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Maintaining the life-training balance
Maintaining the life-training balance
This blog hopes to focus on the "life" side of the training-life balance that anyone training for triathlon will know can be difficult to juggle. No one really cares what interval set I ran today and how high my heart rate got so I won't try and impress anyone with those stats. Stats make the world go round though so for those who are interested I will have Garmin data available for each training session, most stats i throw around on a saturday night are made up, sadly thats not an option with the garmin so you can be assured at least that aspect of this blog will be honest.

NoRestDays Day 18 - Sleep is for the weak

malcolmclelandby malcolmclelandOct 21st 2012
Some people wake up each morning and feel a million bucks, others wake up dead and require several hours to finally hit their straps. I used to lean towards the latter of these two extremes and would often struggle to make it to a 9am lecture at Uni, let alone the 8am lectures we had on Thursday and Friday mornings, of course the previous night out had nothing to do with this. By committing to triathlons you are effectively committing yourself to early mornings and late evenings. In theory the day contains 8 hours for work, 8 hours for sleep, and 8 hours for training, sounds simple enough yet we all know that's never going to happen.

Day 18 saw me partake in my first morning training session of the 21 day challenge so far. Pre-work training is nothing new to me but given a choice I would always exercise in the evening. Due to travel commitments after work I dragged my sleepy butt off to the pool at 6am to wake myself up and ensure I went to work with some super attractive panda eyes from the goggle imprint. My paltry effort of 1.65km in 31 minutes shows just how much I wanted to be there this morning, but its in the books and that's all that will be remembered. I was also satisfied with the minimal effort since the swimming itself felt much better than some of my longer earlier sessions in the pool where I needed floaty arm bands to finish a length without drowning.
NoRestDays Day 18 - Sleep is for the weak
Rich people are generally pretty smart, no surprises there really. I'm neither rich nor smart but there is something I do share in common with these people. I like nice things. A taxi across Auckland can cost $100 easily enough whereas a privately driven BMW 7 series will cost you $120 for an hour and a man in a suit greets you off the plane and carries your bag to the car. Getting a taxi to the Wellington Sevens can be nigh on impossible, but getting 10 of your mates, champagne in hand, into a stretched Limo for drop off at the gate is only $25 per person. The moral of the story, and I'll admit its a stretch, is ask the question because the answer might surprise you. How does this relate to training you might ask? It doesn't, I just wanted to tell you about the private driver we had for Ben's 25th Birthday, life is for living.

Garmin data below
 
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